Allen Franklin Jordan

Computer Programmer, Mathematician



Woodworking

I do woodworking (and some metalworking) in my garage workshop as a hobby, and occasionally use this skill to build jigs/tools for work. Here are some of the projects I have created.

Beer Stein


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  • Mahogany, walnut, cherry, and cottonwood
  • Hinged lid with glass bead
  • Food-safe, waterproof, and alcohol-resistant finish

A wooden beer-stein I made as a gift for a friend.


Penguin Tool Chest


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  • Walnut, cottonwood, spalted maple, and elm
  • Dovetails, inlay, custom silver knobs, wooden hinges

A penguin-themed tool chest I made as a retirement gift for my father. It took me about 9 months to complete.


Folding Knife #3


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  • O1 steel, koa, brass, copper

A lockback folding/pocket knife I built for my co-worker's retirement.


Marking Gauge and Brass Mallet


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  • Padauk, walnut, beech, brass

A marking gauge and brass adjusting mallet I built for a tool swap.


Lap Desk


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  • Curly maple, African mahogany, walnut, cottonwood, jatoba

A lap desk with a wooden-hinged lid I built for a gift exchange.


Folding Knife #2


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  • O1 steel, stabilized maple burl, brass

A lockback folding/pocket knife I built for my father.


Tool Tote


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  • Walnut, cottonwood, red oak, beech

A tool tote I made for my car mechanic neighbour.


Wood-bodied Hand Plane


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  • O1 steel blade, jatoba, hard maple, walnut knob

A wood-bodied hand plane I built for a tool swap.


Hexagonal Knife Rack


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  • Mystery wood (jatoba maybe), padauk, oak plugs

A knife rack with embedded magnets I built for my parents.


Folding Knife #1


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  • O1 steel, bocote, brass

The first lockback folding/pocket knife I built. I made the blade and most other metal parts from bar stock, and did the heat treatment.


Fancy Picture Frame


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  • Curly maple
  • Hand-cut fancy lap joints

A picture frame with elaborate joinery I built for a co-worker.


Pool Cue Rack


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  • African mahogany, walnut inlay

A fancy pool cue rack commissioned by a co-worker, with slots for a bridge stick and short cue.


Wooden Disc Golf Disc


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  • African padauk

A wooden disc for playing disc golf, my first commission. Surprisingly light compared to the usual plastic variety.


Curvy Box #3


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  • Ash, padauk, and bloodwood
  • Splined miters, recessed lid/medallion, brass pinned hinges

A curvy box I made for my boss' retirement, following this set of tutorials.


Bandsaw Box


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  • Purpleheart and mahogany

A box I made on my old bandsaw for my sister.


Maple Burl Bowl


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  • Ambrosia maple, walnut, plain hard maple, padauk, and ash

A bowl I turned from maple burl on my old 1950s-era Delta wood lathe.


Curvy Box #2, with Silver Medallion


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  • Spalted maple, walnut, and padauk
  • Splined miters, recessed lid/medallion, brass pinned hinges
  • My Father's hand-hammered silver repousse medallion

A curvy box my Dad and I built for my Cousin's wedding, following this set of tutorials.


Curvy Box #1


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  • Walnut, padauk, and hard maple
  • Splined miters, recessed medallion, brass pinned hinges

A curvy box I built as a gift for our secretary at NOAA, following this set of tutorials.


Planter

Planter Thumbnail
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  • White oak, walnut, hard maple, and cherry
  • Mortise and tenon joinery, with a cross lapped bottom

I made this planter as part of a woodworking class to practice leg and rail designs.


Tongue Drum

Tongue Drum Thumbnail
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  • Hard maple, padauk, baltic birch ply, and walnut
  • Attempted to tune by undercutting the keys

I made this tongue drum as part of a woodworking class. It plays a lot like a xylophone.


Wooden Computer Case

Wood Computer Thumbnail
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  • Quarter-sawn figured sapele veneer on baltic birch plywood
  • Two hinged sides open for easy access to computer parts
  • Partially ATX compliant for easy component upgrades and repair

A wooden computer case I constructed when first getting into woodworking. A very limited selection of tools was used to build this (mainly a jigsaw and flex shaft grinder), as I didn't have many tools at the time.




My project gallery on LumberJocks
My project albums on imgur


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